Menu

The Just and Well-Ordered

The Realm of Political and Civic Affairs

The Endowment of “The Just and Well-Ordered” refers to the manner in which the institutions and practices of political and civic life contribute to or hinder the capacity of all citizens to thrive. These institutions range from local government and schools to community and neighborhood associations to interest groups and activist organizations. Also included are resources present in a community that support practices necessary for thriving. Among them are the human resources of community networks, strong leadership, and individual and group skills

This endowment is deeply rooted in Jane Jacobs’ idea of the organized complexity of cities. It might even be said that the just management and maintenance of organized complexity is the core task of the institutions and practices encompassed by this endowment.

To learn more about the Endowment of the Just and Well-Ordered, download our research brief below.

The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

Urban Policy: Part 2—Lessons for Small Towns

The Feds to small city officials: Have you tried working with your neighbors?

The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

The Pursuit to Turn Data Into Action

As most ardent supporters of data will admit, even the most sophisticated indicator needs something more: community buy-in.

The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

Urban Policy: Part 1—Lessons From the District

Analysts who head straight for urban policy jobs in Washington without first working within their own local communities are probably not going to be able to understand the perspective on the ground, or what real communities need.

The Good
The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

Common Problems with Public Answers: Peter Levine’s Call for Civic Renewal

In Peter Levine”s new book, he offers guidance and insights for renewing the civic landscape around citizen deliberation and participation.

The Beautiful
The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

Urban Renewal Syndrome—Part 1

Urban renewal programs, along with the social welfare policies of the Great Society, became a symbol not just of the collapse of urban America but also of the failure of progressive government action—perhaps even of liberalism itself.

The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

The Magic of Mayors?

Noah Toly review of Benjamin Barber”s new book If Mayors Rules the World offers critical insight and originality into current discussions regarding the future of urban governance in a globalized world.

The Beautiful
The Just and Well-Ordered
The Sustainable
Blog

Nashville and the Future of Civic Engagement

Transportation debates, like the famed battle between Jane Jacobs and Robert Moses over a proposed expressway through Manhattan, have historically been a local affair. This may be changing. Recent events in Tennessee show that even a local transportation project with widespread support from citizens across the political spectrum is not immune to the ideological politicization that has gripped our national discourse.

The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

The Problem of Assessment: Part III

How do we know if a city is thriving? This post, the final in a series of three, reflects on that question by exploring the history of urban assessment. It exposes some downsides to past approaches, while also highlighting some promising alternatives.

Pages