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Information Overload

“During 2013, 6,922,484 tweets originated in Chicago. That same year, members of the city’s Divvy bike-sharing program logged 750,000 rides and 633,647 callers reported abandoned vehicles, potholes, and rodent infestation through the city’s 311 program.”—Noah Toly, “The City of Big Data—Is It Enough?” Thriving Cities Blog (December 2014)

Living in the era of Big Data and smart technologies, there are few aspects of our cities and communities that will not inevitably be measured in some way. From employment numbers to high school graduation rates, tools abound to track a community’s progress and wellbeing. This information overload is itself a growing challenge for practitioners, leaving cities and communities in a crowded metric market place with little guidance for discernment. Do our cities need more data?

The Beautiful
The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

The City of Big Data—Is It Enough?

During 2013, 6,922,484 tweets originated in Chicago. That same year, members of the city’s Divvy bike-sharing program logged 750,000 rides and 633,647 callers reported abandoned vehicles, potholes, and rodent infestation through the city’s 311 program.

The Beautiful
The Prosperous
The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

Who Is the Smart City for?

In India’s rush to transform, build, and even engineer entire new cities, critics are right to raise concerns about citizenship and access

The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

Harnessing Big Data to Democratic Ends

Can we have the benefits of Big Data without the drawbacks? Is there a way to harness the democratic power of information while also promoting democratic open-mindedness and popular empowerment?

The Beautiful
The Just and Well-Ordered
Blog

Reflecting on "Data" and "Big Data" for Cities

Given the rapid pace of city growth and the concurrent demand for better infrastructure and services, pressure on city leaders and managers to make smart policy and planning decisions around investment has never been greater.

Data

Deluge

Between 2010 and 2020, the amount of digital information created and replicated in the world will grow to an almost inconceivable 35 trillion gigabytes as all major forms of media – voice, TV, radio, print – complete the journey from analog to digital.

Data

Urbanization

From now to 2030, the world will need to build the equivalent of a city of one million people in developing countries every five days.